August 2014 Newsletter

Posted by on Aug 3, 2014 | 0 comments

Plum Mountain Buddhist Community

August 2014 Newsletter

 

Weekly Schedule: Daily 6:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Service with short recitation and half hour seated meditation, at 516 W. Cushing in Aberdeen. This is except for Fridays and when Thay Kobai is away from the Harbor. Our regular community (sangha) gathering is Tuesday evenings at Cushing St. 6:30 to 8 p.m. We do some movement and sitting meditation, with plenty of guidance for newcomers.  Thay Kobai or a senior student gives a short talk on Buddhist principles followed by Q&A and discussion.

 

 

 

Events in August

  5 August: Tuesday, Community Meditation, 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. We do some simple movement and seated meditation, followed by a short talk by Thay Kobai on Ethical Action and a Q&A discussion. People of any or no faith are welcome. See details above.

10 August: Saturday  Full Moon

12 August: Tuesday, Community Meditation, 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. We do some simple movement and seated meditation, followed by a short talk by Thay Kobai and a Q&A discussion. People of any or no faith are welcome.

18 August: Monday, Coffee Talk, Thay Kobai on at 9:10 a.m. on AM1450 KBKW in Aberdeen.

19 August: Tuesday, Community Meditation, 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. We do some simple movement and seated meditation, followed by a short talk by Thay Kobai and a Q&A discussion. People of any or no faith are welcome.

23 August: Saturday Brunch Intensive, 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at 516 W. Cushing in Aberdeen. A pot-luck half day retreat with a sit-walk-sit schedule. Thay Kobai will talk about skillful or wholesome action. Dress comfortably and bring a breakfast dish.

23 August: Saturday Jeff’s (Fa Hsing’s) Birthday.

25 August: Monday: New Moon.

26 August: Community Meditation, 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. We do some simple movement and seated meditation, followed by a short talk by Thay Kobai and a Q&A discussion. People of any or no faith are welcome.

28 August to 9 September: Thay Kobai in California for La Salle Brothers reunion and family visits.

 Some Dharma:

I watched a BBC documentary about the life of the Prophet Mohammad the other day and a British historian mentioned that Mohammad had been an orphan and that this fact had determined the course of much of his lifetime. “He was everyone’s child,” she said to explain how the extended family and the local village had looked after him. He was mentored by one of his uncles and eventually married a wealthy older woman who loved him dearly as well as trusting him to manage her trading businesses. He learned to be a good administrator and negotiator and was noted as a peacemaker among the warring tribes of Arabia—which runs counter to Western stereotypes about militant Islam.

 

Buddhists have ideas like this too. We sometimes point out that any one of us could have been your mother or father in a previous lifetime. We are all kin. We are both parent and child to all living beings.

 

I am everyone’s child in the sense that I learn from, and am guided by, all other sentient beings. Our practice of meditation, mindfulness and ethics is what prepares us to parent other beings and what opens us to the care and guidance that other beings might show to us. This is the Bodhisattva ideal: no one wakes up till we all wake up together. Each one is everyone’s child.

 

 

/Thay Kobai

 Our newsletter is now incorporated into Trout Lake Abbey’s monthly newsletter. There are photos as well as dharma content on that newsletter. To subscribe, email: business@tlabbey.com.

We are happy to be a member of the Northwest Dharma Association
and encourage you to consider joining.

We also participate in the Faith Action Network: www.fanwa.org.

We are also affiliated with Open Gate Zen Center in Olympia. For information on their programs go to www.boundlessmindzen.org.